The Only Constant is Change

Time eventually runs out and you wonder in your heart of hearts if those seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years, and decades were being spent the best way they possibly could.”

As I reflect on almost 24 years with Quick Printing, that quote from Irish author Cecelia Ahern strikes a particular chord. I know the answer to the question that is implicit in the quote. The answer is yes. Unequivocally, yes. My time with QP was certainly spent in the best way it possibly could have been.

In 1990, Bob Hall asked me to help him with a project called the Quick Printing Top 100. We took all his information and created a makeshift spreadsheet out of legal pad sheets and taped it to the wall. A year later, Bob and I were married, I was a contributing editor for QP, the Top 100 was my project, and the spreadsheet was created in an early version of Microsoft Excel.

Together, Bob and I tracked the color revolution; watching companies that once depended on offset duplicators install two-color presses. Parallel to that shift was the development of early color copiers that quickly hit the lightning speed of 12 pages per minute.

The color copiers were also part of a more overarching change in the industry, which was the transition from offset to digital. The digital revolution moved exponentially faster than the color revolution. And things really heated up once electronic media hit its stride. That development heralded a fundamental sea change for print owners.

Through all these shifts, changes, and so-called revolutions, QP kept print owners informed about trends and developments so that they could run their businesses more effectively. That will always be its mission, but now it’s time for the leadership to pass into new hands. I have accepted a position outside the industry that will offer a new set of opportunities and challenges.

Before I sign off, I’ll look back to my first task and remind you one last time to fill out the Top 100 entry form at https://QP2014Top100.questionpro.com. Going forward, industry veteran Mark Vruno will write this column. Please welcome him with all the warmth you have shown me over the past couple of decades.

I want to thank each of you for being part of my life and career. I can never express how much your friendship means to me. If you want to stay in touch, let’s connect on Facebook and LinkedIn. Spend your time well!

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